Blog > Tag: Charlottesville

Innovation at UVA: Some Thoughts on Ideas

Launching a concept toward the creation, development, and introduction of a useful product or method does “take a village,” according to George T. Gillies, who explains how this process looks at the University of Virginia. Mr. Gillies is a research professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering in UVA’s School of Engineering and Applied Science.   […]

Last Thoughts on Jefferson’s “Last Legacies”

Summer Jefferson Symposium, hosted by Lifetime Learning in UVA‘s Office of Engagement from June 21-24, was an opportunity for alumni, parents and friends to share in deep conversation about a brilliant and complicated man. John Ragosta, Summer Jefferson Symposium Faculty Leader, historian at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and […]

Evolution of Finals

Final Exercises are just days away, and University History Officer Alexander G. “Sandy” Gilliam, Professor Emeritus at the University of Virginia, shares a historic and personal look at how they have changed in “Evolution of Finals.” Lifetime Learning‘s May blogs highlight the traditions of graduation, and we invite readers to comment on commencement memories: keynote speakers, […]

Thomas Jefferson’s Last Legacies

Written by John Ragosta, Faculty Leader, Summer Jefferson Symposium; Fellow, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities   We remember Thomas Jefferson primarily for his great accomplishments as a statesman, philosopher, and political leader, including the Declaration of Independence, his presidency, and his leadership of a political movement. But Jefferson lived until he was 83 years old, […]

The Events of August 11th and 12th: A Historian’s Brief Reflections on Charlottesville

Written by Derrick P. Alridge, Professor in the Curry School of Education at the University. His research foci include African American educational history and civil rights.   In the days leading up to August 11 and 12, 2017, when white nationalists and white supremacists converged on Charlottesville, Virginia for the Unite the Right Rally, I […]

Back to School: Lessons After #Charlottesville

  Written by Deborah E. McDowell, Director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences   I greet you at the beginning of a new semester, ecstatic to announce that this past June, after decades of petitioning, the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African […]

#Charlottesville

Written by Kirt von Daacke, Assistant Dean and Professor of History, College of Arts & Sciences The white supremacist intimidation and violence that descended upon the University of Virginia and Charlottesville on August 11th and 12th was horrific and terrifying. The images of torch-bearing angry white supremacists marching on Grounds, shouting Nazi slogans, hurling racist […]

Dealing with the Aftermath

Written by John Schorling, Professor and Head of the Section of General Medicine in the Department of General, Geriatric, Palliative, and Hospital Medicine in the School of Medicine at UVA, in response to the alt-right demonstrations on August 11-12, 2017. The events of August 11 and 12 in Charlottesville continue to impact many individuals as […]

My Violent “Welcome” to Charlottesville

  Chinwe Oriji loves God, loves people, and hates oppression. She is a Woodson Fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute at the University of Virginia and a PhD candidate in African and African Diaspora Studies at UT-Austin. She is also the founder of a race and immigration platform at unispora.com and you can follow […]

Between the Right and a Hard Place: How JFK Pivoted to Righteousness

Written by Barbara Perry, White Burkett Miller Center Professor of Ethics and Institutions and Presidential Studies Director at UVA’s Miller Center. Follow her on Twitter @BarbaraPerryUVA.   We don’t typically think of John F. Kennedy and Donald J. Trump as leading comparable presidencies. Yet they both faced a right-wing faction of their party over the […]