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University of Virginia in 100 Objects

Date & Time

December 5, 2017 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Location

Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library
160 McCormick Road
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Register Now ($150)

Overview

In celebration of the University of Virginia’s Bicentennial 2017-19

Join Lifetime Learning in celebrating the University of Virginia’s Bicentennial with an immersive, day-long experience on the history of UVA in 100 Objects. This remarkable and often forgotten array of significant objects will shine a light on the distant past and provide an important history lesson about Virginia’s National Historic Landmark—the University of Virginia.

The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Curator Molly Schwartzburg will lead the tour through the objects in the library and Brendan Wolfe, author of Mr. Jefferson’s Telescope: A History of the University of Virginia in 100 Objects, will provide insight into why certain objects were selected and some were not. Other tours and lectures will be provided by esteemed University faculty.

Registration includes lunch – with some of Jefferson’s favorite foods – and a signed copy of Mr. Jefferson’s Telescope: A History of the University of Virginia in 100 Objects.

See the schedule below for the full agenda and participating faculty.

Speaker(s)

Molly Schwartzburg

Curator, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

Molly Schwartzburg  is curator of Special Collections at the University of Virginia, an active participant in the Rare Book and Manuscript Section of the American Library Association, a specialist in literary archives, mentor of student assistants and interns, and enthusiast of all things related to the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library.

Schwartzburg received her A.B. in English Literature from Harvard (1991), her Ph.D. in English and American Literature from Stanford (2004) and was previously Cline Curator of Literature at the Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin. Schwartzburg’s current exhibition is A History of UVA in 100 Objects (2017), and she is working on an upcoming exhibition, Faulkner Drafting World Peace (2020), marking the 75th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations.

Receipient of the Lifetime Learning Outstanding Faculty Speaker Recognition in 2017.

Brendan Wolfe

Author, “Mr. Jefferson’s Telescope: A History Of The University Of Virginia In 100 Objects”

Brendan Wolfe is the editor of Encyclopedia Virginia, a project of the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. He is the author of Finding Bix: The Life and Afterlife of a Jazz Legend, about the early jazz musician Bix Beiderbecke, and Mr. Jefferson’s Telescope: A History of the University of Virginia in 100 Objects. His work has appeared in The Morning News, Colorado Review, and VQR. He lives in Charlottesville.

Elgin Cleckley

Assistant Professor of Architecture and Design Thinking

Elgin Cleckley, Assoc. AIA, NOMA, is an Assistant Professor of Architecture and Design Thinking at the University of Virginia, School of Architecture. Elgin teaches Design Thinking studios and foundation courses at the School of Architecture, with appointment in the Curry School of Education and the School of Nursing. Elgin previously was the 3D Group Leader and Design Coordinator at the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada for 16 years, producing architecture, art pieces, and exhibitions for Canada and the world. Elgin holds a  B.S. Arch from the University of Virginia (93’), and an M. Arch from Princeton University (95’). Elgin has taught at the University of Michigan and the University of Illinois, Chicago, working in architectural firms in Toronto, Seattle, Chicago, and New York City.

Dr. Marcus Martin

Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity, Office of Diversity; Professor, School of Medicine

Dr. Marcus L. Martin is Professor and past chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Virginia. He held the chair position from July 1996 to December 2006. Dr. Martin’s Emergency Medicine responsibilities included the adult and pediatric emergency departments, chest pain unit, express care, Pegasus air ambulance, the Blue Ridge Poison Center, paramedic training program, emergency medicine residency program and several emergency medicine fellowship programs. During his tenure at UVA Dr. Martin served as Assistant Dean, School of Medicine, Assistant Vice President for Diversity and Equity and Associate Vice President for Diversity and Equity. On July 25, 2009, Dr. Martin was appointed Interim Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity and on April 1, 2011 Dr. Martin was appointed Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity.

A native of Covington, Virginia, he earned bachelor’s degrees in pulp and paper technology (1970) and chemical engineering (1971) from North Carolina State University and was employed as a production chemical engineer at WESTVACO in Covington, Virginia. A member of the charter class of Eastern Virginia Medical School and the first African American graduate, he earned his medical degree in 1976.

Dr. Martin was commissioned by the US Public Health Service and later served as general medical officer at the Gallup Indian Medical Center in New Mexico. He completed emergency medicine residency training at the University of Cincinnati in 1981 and held a series of staff and administrative/teaching posts at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh. He is a founding member of the Board of Visitors of North Carolina State University. Dr. Martin was the first African American to play varsity football at NC State.

Dr. Martin served as the clinical director of the summer program for underrepresented pre-med students, the Summer Medical Dental Education Program, formerly MAAP. He was the first African-American to head a clinical department at U.Va. He co-chaired the Health System Diversity Council in 2000 and was an inaugural member of the U.Va. Women’s Leadership Council.

With a team of UVa., health care providers, Martin traveled to Louisiana in September 2005 and February 2006 to serve the disadvantaged populations – black and white – through medical relief efforts subsequent to hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Dr. Martin established EMCERT (Emergency Medicine Center for Education, Research and Technology) and the Life Saving Techniques course for medical students at UVa. using computerized human patient simulation. Dr. Martin has published widely in journals and has contributed textbook and book chapters in his area of medical expertise. He was recently selected as one of “the top 100 most influential black graduates of NC State University”. In April 2007 Dr. Martin was appointed by Governor Tim Kaine to serve on the Secure Commonwealth Panel and as Vice Chair of the Virginia Tech Incident Review Panel.

He was a Board Member for 12 years and past-president of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine(SAEM). He is past president of the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors. He received the 1994 Emergency Medicine Residents’ Joseph F. Waeckerle Founders Award. He is the recipient of the 2008 SAEM Diversity Interest Group Leadership Award named the Marcus L. Martin Leadership Award in his honor. Dr. Martin is also the recipient of the Citizen of the Year Award 2008 for the state of Virginia presented by the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity.

Louis Nelson

Associate Provost for Outreach, Office of the Provost; Professor of Architectural History, School of Architecture

Louis Nelson is a Professor of Architectural History and the former Associate Dean in the School of Architecture. In December 2016, Nelson was named Associate Provost for Outreach. Nelson is an accomplished scholar, with two book-length monographs published by UNC and Yale University Presses, three edited collections of essays, two terms as senior co-editor of Buildings and Landscapes—the leading English language venue for scholarship on vernacular architecture—and numerous articles. He is a celebrated teacher, having won a university-wide teaching award in 2007 and served as the 2008 UVA nominee for a state-wide Outstanding Faculty Award. Nelson is a distinguished lecturer having lectured in the past year at St. Andrew’s and Edinburgh Universities in Scotland and Oxford and Cambridge Universities in England as well as at numerous American and Caribbean Universities.

Nelson is a specialist in the built environments of the early modern Atlantic world, with published work on the American South, the Caribbean and West Africa. Nelson’s teaching and research focuses on the close examination of evidence—both material and textual—as a means of interrogating the ways architecture shapes the human experience. His current research engages the spaces of enslavement in West Africa and in the Americas, working to document and interpret the buildings and landscapes that shaped the trans-Atlantic slave trade. He has a second collaborative project working to understand the process of construction and early life at the University of Virginia.

Kirt von Daacke

Assistant Dean; Professor, Undergraduate College of Arts & Sciences

Kirt von Daacke’s research centers upon social constructions of race, community social hierarchies, and identity in eighteenth and nineteenth-century America. He is especially fascinated with studying the complex interplay of race and culture in the antebellum South. His first book, Freedom Has a Face: Race, Identity, and Community in Jefferson’s Albemarle, 1780-1865, came out with the University of Virginia Press in 2012. He is currently working on “Jefferson’s University: The Early Life Project,” a major digital humanities project that he co-founded with art history professor Maurie McInnis. The project will create a comprehensive digital archive of early University records, will track persons, places, and events over time in the Academical Village, and ultimately include a 3-D recreation of central Grounds before the Civil War. Additionally, He’s very excited to be co-chairing the UVa President’s Commission on Slavery and the University. Those scholarly interests grew out of his experience as an undergraduate history major here at the University of Virginia and his time in graduate school at The Johns Hopkins University, where so many of his professors challenged and inspired him as a thinker and scholar both inside and outside the classroom.

Schedule
  • Guided tour of the exhibit with library curator, Molly Schwartzburg
  • Lecture by Brendan Wolfe, Author, Mr. Jefferson’s Telescope: A History Of The University Of Virginia In 100 Objects
  • Lunch menu items include some of Jefferson’s favorites
  • Tour of additional items on Grounds (weather permitting) and a visit to the Rotunda with Louis Nelson, Associate Provost for Outreach, Office of the Provost; Professor of Architectural History, School of Architecture
  • Scholars’ discussion on “Structuring History Around Objects, and the Difficult Task of Balancing Perspectives” with with Elgin Cleckley, Assistant Professor of Architecture and Design Thinking, Molly Schwartzburg and Brendan Wolfe
  • Update from Co-Chairs of the President’s Commission on Slavery and the University: Kirt von Daacke, Associate Professor; Assistant Dean, Department of History, College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences and Marcus Martin, Vice President and Chief Officer for Diversity and Equity, Office of Diversity; Professor, School of Medicine
Cancellation Policy

Cancellation Policy

Participants may cancel their registration for the One-Day UVA; 100 Objects program by emailing Cecelia Magargee at cwm2z@virginia.edu.   Cecelia will send an email notification confirming your cancellation.

Refund Policy

If Lifetime Learning (via Cecelia) receives a cancellation email before midnight on November 6, 2017, you will receive a refund of 50% of your registration fee.

If Lifetime Learning (via Cecelia) receives a cancellation email after midnight on November 6, 2017, no refund will be issued.

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