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Pavilion V on the UVA Lawn

Lewis and Clark: An Overview of the Expedition

Date & Time

June 15, 2021 @ 3:00 PM - 4:15 PM EST

Location

Online, Live Captioning

Register Now (Free)

Overview

This presentation will discuss Thomas Jefferson’s reasons for proposing this expedition and the goals of reaching the Pacific and establishing trade and diplomacy with an array of Native peoples on the way to the West Coast. It will describe the challenges that the expedition faced and the role of Native peoples in helping or hindering its progress.

This presentation is the first in a series of lectures in the Jefferson’s West: Lewis, Clark, and the Native Americans program during June 2021. Please see the upcoming events list and join us for more expert lectures on this summer expedition!

Speaker(s)

Alan Taylor

Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor of History, Corcoran Department of History, A&S

A graduate of Colby College (1977), Alan Taylor received his PhD in American history from Brandeis University in 1986. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute of Early American History and Culture in Williamsburg, Virginia from 1985-1987, he taught at Boston University, 1987-1994; the University of California at Davis, 1994-2014; and the University of Virginia, where he holds the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Chair, 2014-.

Taylor has published nine books: Liberty Men and Great Proprietors: The Revolutionary Settlement on the Maine Frontier, 1760-1820 (1990); William Cooper’s Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early Republic, (1995); American Colonies (2001); Writing Early American History (2005); The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution (2006); The Civil War of 1812: American Citizens, British Subjects, Irish Rebels, & Indian Allies (2010); The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia (2013); American Revolutions: A Continental History, 1750-1804 (2016); and Thomas Jefferson’s Education (2019).

William Cooper’s Town won the Bancroft, Beveridge, and Pulitzer Prizes. The Internal Enemy won the Pulitzer Prize for American history and the Merle Curti Prize for Social History (OAH). American Colonies won the 2001 Gold Medal for Non-Fiction from the Commonwealth Club of California. The Divided Ground won the 2007 Society for Historians of the Early Republic book prize and the 2004-7 Society of the Cincinnati triennial book prize. The Civil War of 1812 won the Empire State History Prize and was a finalist for the George Washington Prize.

His current book project, entitled American Republics: A Continental History of the United States, 1783-1850, examines the social and political history of this nation, emphasizing territorial expansion and relations with Canada, Haiti, Mexico, and Native Americans.

For a dozen years, he served as the faculty advisor for the California State Social Science and History Project, which provides curriculum support and professional development for K-12 teachers in history and social studies. In 2002 he won the University of California at Davis Award for Teaching and Scholarly Achievement and the Phi Beta Kappa, Northern California Association, Teaching Excellence Award.

Registration

Registration is free and open to all.

After you register, you will receive a confirmation email with your link to the Zoom webinar. Please check your spam folder for emails from Eventbrite. We will also send a reminder email two days before and two hours before the event.

This presentation is the first in a series of lectures in the Jefferson’s West: Lewis, Clark, and the Native Americans program during June 2021. Please see the upcoming events list and join us for more expert lectures on this summer expedition!

Program Host

Lifetime Learning is a program in the Office of Engagement. You can follow us on FacebookTwitter, the Thoughts From the Lawn blog, or subscribe to our email list and we will send you notifications about upcoming Lifetime Learning events, information, and offerings.

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