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First Loves, Last Loves: Jefferson, Monticello, and UVA

Written by John Ragosta, Summer Jefferson Symposium Faculty Leader and historian at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello   Everyone has a first love: wildly impassioned, sometimes reckless, undoubtedly wrapped in dreams of a long life together. But what of last loves? More mature; a deep, abiding warmth for heat; […]

Diversity Enshrined: Religious freedom and the American experiment

Written by John Ragosta, Lead Faculty, Lifetime Learning Summer Jefferson Symposium; Fellow, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. John Ragosta column: originally published by the Richmond Times-Dispatch. Reprinted with permission.   Today is Religious Freedom Day, a chance to remember the critical importance to our nation of Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom and […]

Thomas Jefferson’s Last Legacies

Written by John Ragosta, Faculty Leader, Summer Jefferson Symposium; Fellow, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities   We remember Thomas Jefferson primarily for his great accomplishments as a statesman, philosopher, and political leader, including the Declaration of Independence, his presidency, and his leadership of a political movement. But Jefferson lived until he was 83 years old, […]

Thomas Jefferson: An In-depth Look at the Man We Have Immortalized: Some Early Thoughts

  Written by John Ragosta, Summer Jefferson Symposium Lead Faculty; Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, Fellow   The week of March 14 I spoke at several venues in Culpeper and Orange Counties about the development of religious freedom during and immediately after the American Revolution. Of course, Thomas Jefferson played a large part in those […]

“Thomas Jefferson’s Architectural and Landscape Aesthetics: Sources and Meaning” – Part 3

By: Richard Guy Wilson, Commonwealth Professor and Chair, Department of Architectural History From these books along with travel Jefferson learned about architecture and the type he preferred was controlled by rules that included geometry, symmetry, balance, composition and proportion. The five orders: Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite were the controlling element and from them and […]

“Thomas Jefferson’s Architectural and Landscape Aesthetics: Sources and Meaning” – Part 2

By: Richard Guy Wilson, Commonwealth Professor and Chair, Department of Architectural History Jefferson’s knowledge of architecture came from a variety of different sources since schools of architecture did not exist in North America. The major way he learned came through books, travel and observation, and construction. The architect’s role in Jefferson’s time lay not just as […]