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Blog > Category: Psychology

Perfecting Imperfection

“When we learn self-compassion, we are able to have genuine compassion for the frailties and unwise actions of others,” says Dr. Matthew Goodman, an associate professor of internal medicine in the University of Virginia‘s School of Medicine. Dr. Goodman is a senior teacher in the UVA Mindfulness Center of the Division of General, Geriatric, Palliative & […]

COVID’s Silver Lining for American Families

The trials and tribulations of the pandemic have given many of us hopes for a stronger family future, according to two University of Virginia researchers. Bradford Wilcox is a professor in the Department of Sociology in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences and director of UVA’s National Marriage Project. Victoria Spiotto is […]

It Is OK Not to Feel OK

“We make the situation worse when we punish ourselves for feeling sad or anxious or angry,” says Bethany Teachman of how we have managed our emotions during the past year. Teachman is a professor, the director of clinical training, and the director of the Program for Anxiety, Cognition, and Treatment (PACT) in the Department of […]

Reflections on Resilience and Interconnection in 2020

We end 2020 with a reflection on a year of hardship and hope. Anthony DeMauro, associate director of Dalai Lama Fellows at the Contemplative Sciences Center at the University of Virginia, shares his thoughts on the collective care vital to our resilience and interconnection during this holiday season–and far beyond it. Lifetime Learning wishes you […]

Students Are Making Their Mental Health a Priority–and That’s a Good Thing

“Over the past several years, college students seem to be emerging from the shadows of past generations’ stigma regarding mental illness,” reports Nicole Ruzek of UVA’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Ruzek is the director of CAPS in the Department of Student Health and Wellness at the University of Virginia. She recently hosted “Meditation on […]

Memory in the Time of a Pandemic

Why do we remember some memories in detail and others more generally? Nicole Long shares her research on the processes behind forming memories. Long is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and principal investigator in the Long Term Memory Lab in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of […]

What It Means to Matter

During this time of societal change and discontent, we need to matter. Dr. Julie Haizlip explains why mattering is an essential element of our well-being. Dr.  Haizlip is a clinical professor of nursing and director of the Center for Appreciative Practice in the School of Nursing, and co-director of the Center for Interprofessional Collaborations at […]

Giving Voice to Values

Questions of ethics arise in our professional and personal lives, and Mary Gentile recommends that problem-solving should go beyond placing blame and asking “what is the right thing to do?” Gentile is Creator/Director, Giving Voice To Values and Professor of Practice, Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia. We welcome your comments below. […]

A Contemplative Pause: Practice for Learning and Living

Self-reflection, practicing gratitude, and noticing dispositions can be transformative in teaching and in life. During this Thanksgiving season, Karolyn Kinane gives us pause to contemplate “how we are being with each other.” Kinane is associate director of faculty engagement and pedagogy, Contemplative Sciences Center at the University of Virginia. We welcome your thoughtful comments below. […]