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Diversity Enshrined: Religious freedom and the American experiment

Written by John Ragosta, Lead Faculty, Lifetime Learning Summer Jefferson Symposium; Fellow, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. John Ragosta column: originally published by the Richmond Times-Dispatch. Reprinted with permission.   Today is Religious Freedom Day, a chance to remember the critical importance to our nation of Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom and […]

Thomas Jefferson’s Last Legacies

Written by John Ragosta, Faculty Leader, Summer Jefferson Symposium; Fellow, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities   We remember Thomas Jefferson primarily for his great accomplishments as a statesman, philosopher, and political leader, including the Declaration of Independence, his presidency, and his leadership of a political movement. But Jefferson lived until he was 83 years old, […]

Senate 2018: Republican Edge Runs Up Against Trump, History

Reposted with permission from Sabato’s Crystal Ball. Beyond president’s poor numbers lies difficulty of beating out-of-power party incumbents Kyle Kondik, Managing Editor, Sabato’s Crystal Ball August 24th, 2017 Ever since Donald Trump won the presidency, 2018’s race for the Senate seemed to pit two powerful, competing forces against one another: the Republicans’ long and enticing […]

Patrick Henry: The Trumpet of the Revolution

Written by John A. Ragosta, faculty director of the Summer Jefferson Symposium offered by UVA’s Lifetime Learning, authored Patrick Henry: Proclaiming a Revolution (Routledge Press, 2016) and is the lecturer for the Coursera online course Patrick Henry: Forgotten Founder, co-sponsored by the Lifetime Learning and the Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation.   Patrick Henry “certainly gave […]

Filling in the Blanks in the History Books

  Written by: Abby Palko, Director of the Maxine Platzer Lynn Women’s Center at UVA   Here at the Maxine Platzer Lynn Women’s Center, we celebrate International Women’s Month, which grew out of International Women’s Day. Because International Women’s Day always falls during Spring Break, we feel it’s important to offer programming throughout the month […]

Moving Black Girls to the Center of Women’s History Month

Written by Corinne Field, University of Virginia Assistant Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality In the past few years, black girls around the globe have proved their power as political activists, creative artists, and community builders.  From #SayHerName and #BlackGirlMagic in the US to student protests in France and South Africa, black girls have led […]

Thomas Jefferson’s Paris

  Written by Richard Guy Wilson, Commonweath Professor’s Chair in Architectural History, University of Virginia     The years 1784-1789 Thomas Jefferson spent in Paris and in Europe. They proved to be extremely important in the development of his appreciation of architecture, landscape and garden design, painting and sculpture, decorative and other arts. He loved the […]