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We can celebrate religious freedom by keeping religion separate from government

January 16 is Religious Freedom Day and John Ragosta discusses how Thomas Jefferson offered guidance for today’s difficult questions about religion and the law. Mr. Ragosta is the lead faculty for Lifetime Learning‘s Summer Jefferson Symposium and a historian at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. The following article by […]

Man of Action

November 30 marks 145 years since Winston Churchill, British military leader and statesman, was born. C. Brian Kelly, Assistant Professor,  Department of English in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia, presents the daring, youthful side of Churchill in his article. Mr. Kelly teaches news writing at UVA […]

Why Now Is The Time To Give War and Peace a Chance

‘Tis almost the season for lounging in a comfy armchair with a book in your lap–a big book. Andrew Kaufman, Lecturer, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia, makes a case for choosing Tolstoy’s War and Peace as your holiday reading […]

The Dracula Image

Fangs, a black cape, the classic widow’s peak—from where did Count Dracula get his distinguished features? Stanley Stepanic, Assistant Professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia, is a Dracula expert. In his article, he gives a history behind the image […]

Assistants to Nature: Midwives, Obstetrics, and the Medical Turn

From the 18th through 20th centuries, the birthing process saw a shift from the hands of female midwives to the instruments of male obstetricians. Lara Musser describes this shift in “Assistants to Nature: Midwives, Obstetrics, and the Medical Turn,” a current exhibit in UVA’s Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. Ms. Musser is a lecturer in […]

The Founding of Thomas Jefferson’s University

  A conference celebrating the bicentennial of the founding of the University of Virginia was sponsored in May 2018 by the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello in cooperation with the American Philosophical Society. The resulting book of essays, The Founding of Thomas Jefferson’s University (ed. by John A. Ragosta, Peter S. Onuf, Andrew […]

Downhill/Uphill: A Mountain and an Academical Village–Part 2

Authors Nancy Takahashi and Garth Anderson discuss in detail the University of Virginia‘s historical dependency on resources from “Parcel 1B,” a lesser-known tract of land in the Academical Village. Ms. Takahashi is a Distinguished Lecturer and Director of UVA’s Graduate Landscape Architecture Program in the School of Architecture. Mr. Anderson is the Facilities Historian in […]

Downhill/Uphill: A Mountain and an Academical Village–Part 1

“Parcels 1A and 1B” may not have a familiar ring, yet the contributions of this land throughout the University of Virginia’s history are significant. In this article, authors Nancy Takahashi and Garth Anderson explain the long-standing relationship between two tracts of land in the life story of UVA. Nancy Takahashi is a Distinguished Lecturer and […]

The Meeting of Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George III

Revolutions strain diplomatic relations, and Andrew O’Shaughnessy describes how the American Revolution was no exception. Mr. O’Shaughnessy is a professor in the Corcoran Department of History in the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia and serves as Vice President of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation and Saunders Director of […]

Celebrate the Fourth!

On July 4th we celebrate the birth of a nation based on a principle of equality for its citizens. As John Ragosta details in his piece, the struggle to fulfill this vision is ongoing. Mr. Ragosta is the faculty director of Lifetime Learning‘s Summer Jefferson Symposium at the University of Virginia, historian at Monticello’s Robert […]