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Some Thoughts on the Process for Considering Nominees to the Supreme Court

The Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh concluded last week with a confirmation vote expected soon. James Todd, a lecturer in the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Virginia, offers commentary on […]

Remembering Aretha

Aretha Franklin, remembered as the “Queen of Soul” to fans worldwide, died on August 16, 2018. Deborah McDowell shares a personal account of a time in October 2010 when she organized a symposium at the University of Virginia in Aretha’s honor. Ms. McDowell is the Alice Griffin Professor of English and Director, Carter G. Woodson […]

Last Thoughts on Jefferson’s “Last Legacies”

Summer Jefferson Symposium, hosted by Lifetime Learning in UVA‘s Office of Engagement from June 21-24, was an opportunity for alumni, parents and friends to share in deep conversation about a brilliant and complicated man. John Ragosta, Summer Jefferson Symposium Faculty Leader, historian at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and […]

Trees on the Lawn

  June in Charlottesville brings a sense of quiet beauty, with spring rains transitioning to verdant summer foliage. Helen A. Wilson, Senior Landscape Architect at the University of Virginia, offers a look at the trees that grace the Grounds in her article “Trees on the Lawn.” Ms. Wilson holds a BS in Architecture and a Master […]

Evolution of Finals

Final Exercises are just days away, and University History Officer Alexander G. “Sandy” Gilliam, Professor Emeritus at the University of Virginia, shares a historic and personal look at how they have changed in “Evolution of Finals.” Lifetime Learning‘s May blogs highlight the traditions of graduation, and we invite readers to comment on commencement memories: keynote speakers, […]

Living in the Anthropocene

In recognition of Earth Day on April 22, Justin McBrien, PhD Candidate, Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia, has contributed “Living in the Anthropocene.” Justin was awarded the 2018 Frank Finger Graduate Fellowship for Teaching, awarded annually to a teaching assistant in the College of Arts & Sciences in recognition of stimulating […]

The Enduring Fascination of George Washington

  Written by William M. Ferraro, Research Associate Professor and Senior Associate Editor, The Washington Papers, College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences George Washington still attracts attention.  Some one million people visit his Mount Vernon home every year.  Both scholarly and popular investigations of his life and role in historical events pour forth […]

From the Director: The History of Black History Month

Written by Deborah McDowell, Director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, and Alice Griffin Professor of English, College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences   Yesterday began the official celebration of Black History Month, founded by the Woodson Institute’s namesake, Carter Godwin Woodson.  To kick off the 28-day celebration, yesterday’s […]

Diversity Enshrined: Religious freedom and the American experiment

Written by John Ragosta, Lead Faculty, Lifetime Learning Summer Jefferson Symposium; Fellow, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. John Ragosta column: originally published by the Richmond Times-Dispatch. Reprinted with permission.   Today is Religious Freedom Day, a chance to remember the critical importance to our nation of Thomas Jefferson’s Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom and […]

Thomas Jefferson’s Last Legacies

Written by John Ragosta, Faculty Leader, Summer Jefferson Symposium; Fellow, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities   We remember Thomas Jefferson primarily for his great accomplishments as a statesman, philosopher, and political leader, including the Declaration of Independence, his presidency, and his leadership of a political movement. But Jefferson lived until he was 83 years old, […]