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Thomas Jefferson: A Founder Worth Remembering?

What should we think about Thomas Jefferson? John Ragosta will discuss Jefferson’s contributions and contradictions at UVA’s Founder’s Day celebration on Friday, April 12 in Old Cabell Hall at 1:00 pm. Mr. Ragosta holds his PhD and JD from the University of Virginia where he is the faculty leader of Lifetime Learning’s Summer Jefferson Symposium. […]

Fairfax of Virginia

Lifetime Learning‘s UVA at Oxford Seminar will take place at Trinity College, University of Oxford from September 14-20, 2019. Andrew O’Shaughnessy and Jeanie Grant Moore will lead an in-depth exploration of “The Old World and the New: Britain and America.” Mr. O’Shaughnessy is a Professor of History in the Corcoran Department of History at the […]

Ten Russian Novels You Need To Read To Be a Better Human

Book recommendations have been popular with our Lifetime Learning Thoughts From the Lawn followers, and this reprint of Andy Kaufman‘s newsletter article gives more titles to add to your reading list. Mr. Kaufman is a lecturer in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at […]

Books for the Holidays and New Year

Holiday downtime and New Year’s resolutions open the door to reading new titles. Barbara Perry offers book suggestions on influential U.S. political figures on both sides of the aisle, highlighting George H.W. and Barbara Bush. Ms. Perry is the Gerald L. Baliles Professor and Director of Presidential Studies at the Miller Center at the University […]

Season’s Greetings, on Postage Stamps

Holiday postage stamps not only deliver greeting cards, but carry a history in the separation of church and state debate, according to Richard Handler, professor in the Department of Anthropology in the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and director of the Global Development Studies Program at the University of Virginia. Mr. Handler […]

Their Time, Our Time

This Sunday, November 11, 2018 marks the World War I Armistice centennial, when guns on the Western Front fell silent. Mr. C. Brian Kelly gives us an interesting look at some of the key characters behind the first global war in his article “Their Time, Our Time.” Mr. Kelly is an assistant professor and teaches […]

Matera

  Naples, Pompeii, Sicily, the Amalfi Coast–all familiar names in culturally rich Southern Italy. But Matera? This city of pale gold limestone, once dubbed “the shame of Italy,” is now energized with new life. David T. Gies, Commonwealth Professor of Spanish Emeritus, College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia, […]

The Most Famous Vampire in History

Mr. Stanley Stepanic (GSAS ’07, ’12), Associate Professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia and professor of the now famous Dracula class, will lead a Digital Book Club discussion on the classic vampire book Interview with the Vampire by Anne […]

Some Thoughts on the Process for Considering Nominees to the Supreme Court

The Senate Judiciary Committee hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh concluded last week with a confirmation vote expected soon. James Todd, a lecturer in the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Virginia, offers commentary on […]

Remembering Aretha

Aretha Franklin, remembered as the “Queen of Soul” to fans worldwide, died on August 16, 2018. Deborah McDowell shares a personal account of a time in October 2010 when she organized a symposium at the University of Virginia in Aretha’s honor. Ms. McDowell is the Alice Griffin Professor of English and Director, Carter G. Woodson […]