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RBG: Jimmy Carter’s “Notorious” Judicial Legacy

Ruth Bader Ginsburg might not have ascended to the Supreme Court if President Carter had not developed a deliberate affirmative action strategy. Barbara Perry explains the significance of Carter’s appointment of Ginsburg to the DC Circuit bench. Perry (@BarbaraPerryUVA) is the Gerald L. Baliles Professor and Director of Presidential Studies at the University of Virginia‘s […]

A New Biography of John F. Kennedy Might Calm Your Election Jitters

“JFK himself will remain firmly embedded in history as long as worthy biographies about him continue to appear in each new age,” says Barbara A. Perry about Fredrik Logevall’s new work: JFK: Coming of Age in the American Century, 1917-1956. Perry (@BarbaraPerryUVA) is the Gerald L. Baliles Professor and Director of Presidential Studies at the […]

Speak, Memory: Poetry and Survival After the Atomic Bombings

August 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of WWII. Chad R. Diehl gives us a personal and poignant look at a unique bombing survivor’s representation of trauma through the Japanese art of tanka. Diehl is an assistant professor in the Corcoran Department of History […]

Pandemic Stories: UVA Nursing

        Nurses have been at the forefront of public health crises throughout history and collecting their stories is a mission of the Eleanor Crowder Bjoring Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry at the University of Virginia‘s School of Nursing. Beth Hundt, clinical assistant professor and Bjoring Center associate; Maura Singleton, Bjoring Center program manager; […]

Thomas Jefferson, Land, and Liberty

Land ownership was important to Thomas Jefferson’s ideal of “equal citizenship,” and he looked westward for new frontiers. John Ragosta, a historian at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello and lead faculty of the Virtual Summer Jefferson Symposium 2020 presented by the University of Virginia‘s Lifetime Learning, looks at how […]

Law Touched Our Hearts: A Generation Remembers Brown v. Board of Education

Mildred Wigfall Robinson has been a faculty member of the University of Virginia‘s School of Law since 1985 and is retiring in May. She shares her story of the impact of the 1954 landmark case, Brown v. Board of Education, throughout her lifetime. Robinson and School of Law colleague, Richard J. Bonnie, have published a […]

The Lawn & Roman Architecture–Part 2

Beware the Ides of March! In this second part of Dylan Rogers’ article about the influence of Roman architecture on Jefferson’s designs for the University, he takes us on a walk down the Lawn from the Rotunda to Pavilion X. Rogers is a lecturer in Roman Art & Archaeology at the McIntire Department of Art […]

The Lawn & Roman Architecture–Part 1

Beware the Ides of March! Just as March 15th was a turning point in Roman history, so too was exposure to Roman architecture a turning point for Thomas Jefferson. Dylan Rogers, Lecturer in Roman Art & Archaeology, describes how Jefferson’s first-hand observations of Roman sites influenced his design of the University of Virginia as well […]

Madison’s Role in the Founding of the University of Virginia

James Madison was a key friend and advisor to Thomas Jefferson as plans for the University of Virginia were developed, and he remained involved in the project after Jefferson’s death. Jim Todd, Assistant Professor in UVA’s Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, gives us an interesting […]

Reminder of a ‘Last Man’

With the Oscar-nominated film, 1917, out in theaters, World War I is a hot topic of conversation among history buffs. C. Brian Kelly remembers Edouard Izac, WWI’s last surviving Medal of Honor recipient and one-time resident of Gordonsville, Virginia–near Charlottesville–who died thirty years ago on January 17. Mr. Kelly is Assistant Professor, Department of English […]