Being Thankful in Difficult Times

As we approach Thanksgiving in an unusual November, John Ragosta reflects on the writings of Thomas Jefferson and his words: “…to be thankful for what we have, rather than thoughtful about what we have not.” Ragosta is the lead faculty for Lifetime Learning‘s Summer Jefferson Symposium, a fellow at Virginia Humanities, and author of Religious Freedom: […]

Students Are Making Their Mental Health a Priority–and That’s a Good Thing

“Over the past several years, college students seem to be emerging from the shadows of past generations’ stigma regarding mental illness,” reports Nicole Ruzek of UVA’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Ruzek is the director of CAPS in the Department of Student Health and Wellness at the University of Virginia. She recently hosted “Meditation on […]

The Jewish Grandchildren of Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson

“Origins are not destiny,” writes James Loeffler, considering how the past can shape the next chapter of American history. Loeffler is the Jay Berkowitz Professor of Jewish History in the Corcoran Department of History and the Ida and Nathan Kolodiz Director of Jewish Studies in the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at […]

Pandemics and the Power of History

What lessons has the past taught us about containing diseases? Christian McMillen suggests that particular social and biological conditions historically have given rise to the emergence of epidemics and pandemics. McMillen is a professor in the Corcoran Department of History and associate dean for the social sciences in the College and Graduate School of Arts […]

The Wonder of Fall Migration

David Carr, director of UVA’s Blandy Experimental Farm and State Arboretum of Virginia, presented a virtual lecture on autumn migration sponsored by Lifetime Learning in October 2020. Carr, a research professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia, answers questions (below) […]

Some Thoughts and Remembrances on Faculty Entrepreneurship

Looking back on his career at the University of Virginia, George Gilles reflects on his impactful work with students and colleagues. Gillies is a research professor emeritus in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in UVA’s School of Engineering and Applied Science. We welcome your comments below!   During my 35 years on the […]

RBG: Jimmy Carter’s “Notorious” Judicial Legacy

Ruth Bader Ginsburg might not have ascended to the Supreme Court if President Carter had not developed a deliberate affirmative action strategy. Barbara Perry explains the significance of Carter’s appointment of Ginsburg to the DC Circuit bench. Perry (@BarbaraPerryUVA) is the Gerald L. Baliles Professor and Director of Presidential Studies at the University of Virginia‘s […]

A New Biography of John F. Kennedy Might Calm Your Election Jitters

“JFK himself will remain firmly embedded in history as long as worthy biographies about him continue to appear in each new age,” says Barbara A. Perry about Fredrik Logevall’s new work: JFK: Coming of Age in the American Century, 1917-1956. Perry (@BarbaraPerryUVA) is the Gerald L. Baliles Professor and Director of Presidential Studies at the […]

Memory in the Time of a Pandemic

Why do we remember some memories in detail and others more generally? Nicole Long shares her research on the processes behind forming memories. Long is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and principal investigator in the Long Term Memory Lab in the College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of […]

Speak, Memory: Poetry and Survival After the Atomic Bombings

August 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of WWII. Chad R. Diehl gives us a personal and poignant look at a unique bombing survivor’s representation of trauma through the Japanese art of tanka. Diehl is an assistant professor in the Corcoran Department of History […]